Behavioral Science Research at Hopelab

How can social media be harnessed to support mental health? Can acts of kindness be digitized to boost resilience? How might an app deepen real-world relationships?

At Hopelab, we’re applying behavioral science to answer these and many other big questions facing digital health today.

Our research team is a passionate, dedicated group of interdisciplinary scientists who come together to drive innovation in ways that make a real difference in the health and well-being of teens and young adults. Experts are available for media interviews; contact robin@hopelab.org for more information.

Published Research

Mother looking down at baby on a bed.
Behavior Change

The present study explores barriers and facilitators experienced by public health nurses introducing a mobile health technology platform (Goal Mama) to the Nurse-Family Partnership home-visiting program.

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Young person in the foreground looking up, holding a mobile phone
Mental Health

One year into the pandemic, a new survey reveals that teens and young adults are actively turning to online sources to cope with mental health.

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Vivibot mascot
Chatbots

This pilot randomized controlled trial examined the feasibility of delivering positive psychology skills via the Vivibot chatbot and its effects on key psychosocial well-being outcomes in young adults treated for cancer.

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Behavioral Science Collaborations

Academic Partnerships to Support our Mission

The behavioral science team at Hopelab conducts rigorous research on health, well-being, and technology. This research informs the development of science-based technologies to improve the lives health and well-being of teens and young adults. But we can’t do it all ourselves. To achieve our objectives, we also collaborate with and provide support for some of the best and brightest minds in adolescent health, developmental neuroscience, and positive psychology to generate actionable insights on:

  • New powerful metrics of health and well-being
  • Innovative technologies that promote health and well-being in youth

Behavioral Science Collaborations

Behavioral Science Collaborations

In collaboration with Dr. Andrew Fuligni from The University of California, Los Angeles, we are expanding the research showing health-protective benefits from “acts of kindness” interventions.

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Teens looking at mobile phone.
Behavioral Science Collaborations

In collaboration with Dr. Tamara Taggart from George Washington University,  we’re examining the use of online crowdsourcing contests to directly engage youth in the development of behavioral health interventions.

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Teen looking at mobile phone.
Behavioral Science Collaborations

In collaboration with Dr. Sonya Lyubomirsky from The University of California, Riverside, we are expanding prosocial research that might benefit young adult health.

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Two people having a conversation.
Behavioral Science Collaborations

In collaboration with Dr. Edith Chen from Northwestern University, we are investigating whether and in what ways a year-long mentoring program might impact the metabolic and cardiovascular health of mentors.

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Teen looking at mobile phone.
Behavioral Science Collaborations

In collaboration with Dr. Glen Coppersmith and Dr. Alex Fine of Qntfy, we’re investigating whether specific social media behaviors are related to mental health and well-being in youth.

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Teens looking at mobile phone.
Behavioral Science Collaborations

In collaboration with Dr. Emily Falk from the University of Pennsylvania, we’re investigating whether youth’s real-world social networks influence the way their brains respond to information and how that shapes behavior choices.

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Stressed teen looking at laptop
Behavioral Science Collaborations

In collaboration with UCLA researchers, we aim to identify how providing social support affects adolescents’ emotional resilience to stress.

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